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VIRTUAL REALITY ARCHAEOLOGY

Acoma Pueblo, Sky City, Data from 1934 Historic American Building Survey, New Mexico

Acoma Pueblo computer model 360 degree panorama.

AcomaCurtis

Acoma Fiest Day. Photo by Edward Curtis.

Click here for Acoma animation.

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    Aerial view of Acoma 1934 computer model looking north. Note the single house with a metal roof, just right of center.
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    Photograph from Historic American Buildings Survey M. James Slack, Photographer, April 12, 1934. BLOCK NO. 3 FROM SOUTHEAST (STARTING WITH HOUSE NO. 6).
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    Acoma Pueblo, Block 8 elevations as measured by HABS in 1934.
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    Acoma Pueblo, Block 8 roof plan as measured by HABS in 1934.
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    Acoma: computer model of Block #1 looking south.
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    Acoma: computer model of Block #1 looking north.
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    Acoma computer model looking southwest from northside of mesa top.
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    Acoma computer model looking west along the northern-most "street" of the Pueblo.
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    Acoma computer model aerial looking north.
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    Acoma computer model aerial looking northeast.
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© 2009, Dennis R. Holloway Architect

The HABS 1934 ACOMA MODEL

In 1934, a group of unemployed architects from Colorado got a federal grant to measure important native cultural architecture in the Southwest. Acoma Pueblo, one of the oldest continuously inhabited places in the US, was selected for study. The Elders of the Pueblo permitted the architects to measure all buildings on the outside surface, but only three houses on the inside.

During the 1998-99 winter months, I began work on the computer reconstruction of Acoma Pueblo (Sky City) using data from the drawings and measurements made in the 1934 Historic American Buildings Survey Project (HABS). This was a slow and painstaking project, however, during the many hours I spent in construction, I began to experience Old Acoma with a sense of place in the details. This detail is what I have been looking for in my efforts to recreate Native American places. Thanks to the HABS architects; this detailed information was an invaluable archive, and it has been an honor and privilege to be able to experience this place with this detail.